Alexandra Greenspan

Review: letR

I just discovered this amazingly innovative communication and social media technology. It's called letR.

It really shows how far ubiquitous computing is going, when we're already at the point of making things so physical, so tangible.

With letR, you can fold it, you can tear it, you can crumple it up...and you can still behold the meaning in it. Astounding!

It's also taking privacy to a whole new level, while putting it out of your hands at the same time - like Snapchat, but with more time and effort on the part of people you interact with through letR. It's almost as if this technology is a comment on every social media site of today.

It's something simple enough for your grandparents to learn. If that isn't inclusive then I don't know what is.

It's not eco-friendly yet, but they’ll probably update that in the next release.

There are also many different themes you can “wrap” your letR in. They’re called velopes. Furthermore, there are endless amounts of fonts and colors for letR - you can customize to your heart's content.

What’s their money-making plan?

Big-time users are going to pay for things called s.tmps. These also go on letR so that people know that you’re an advanced, paying user! Makes you feel special, doesn't it?

The best part of letR is that it's most likely cheaper than your smartphone or computer. And, if you upgrade now, you’ll get a free stylus thrown in. It's a high quality stylus called BallPoint, which is even pressure-sensitive. But nevertheless, most types of styluses (styli?) work with letR - showing how multipurpose this technology is. They don't want to confine you - they simply want to help you communicate effectively with your social network.

If Facebook is too passé for you, Twitter too confining to a word character limit, and Tumblr too mainstream, don’t miss this offer! Become an early subscriber!

letR

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Author

Alexandra Greenspan

In third grade, Alexandra wrote a book titled "Bear Bear and the Mystery of the Magic Leaf." It won the Room 21 award for best book. She hopes to put her award-winning writing skills to good use.